Excited for New Pups on the Way!

Rush Fontana

I am currently about 10-14 days out from the first golden retriever litter I have ever bred. The dam is Fontana (Windridge Love is All You Need!) and the sire is Rush (Joyful’s Fast-Trak Thrill of a Lifetime).

Fontana is a nice, calm dog. She has fairly strong retrieving desire and is quite biddable. She is a hair soft, but she is stable and nice. She can play fetch or she can sleep on the bed without much concern. She is good with children.  She is smaller, weighing 43 pounds in working weight.

Rush is from top obedience and agility lines  He is darker than Fontana, and he has full-blown ball drive. Like her, he is smaller and lighter boned, weighing about 50-55 pounds.

Most of the puppies in this litter will be on the smaller side for the breed, though we cannot guarantee that all of them will be that small. We should get a mixture higher drive pups that are like the sire, and we should also get some that are calm like the mother. We should also get a wide range of golden shades in this litter, for the dam’s parent’s have also produced a few dogs that approach the cream color. The sire comes from lines that produce very dark colored dogs.

This litter will have a very low COI by pedigree. Over 10 generations, it has been calculated at 0.01 percent, which is well below the breed average.

Sire has all the GRCA required health clearances, and his hips are OFA “Good” and elbows “Normal.” Dam has OFA prelims of Good hips and Normal Elbows as well.

Dam has been DNA tested by Embark and was found to be clear of all eye diseases that the company tests for, including various forms of PRA.  She is also clear for the peculiar golden retriever form of Ichthyosis.

I used to write a lot about golden retrievers on this blog, and the pups that will be produced from this breeding will match a lot of what I think golden retrievers should be. These pups should be great for working homes and as wonderful family companions.

We still have some slots available for this litter, so if you’re interested please send an email to dogsofwindridge@gmail.com or use the contact form at the Retrieverlady blog/Windridge website. I can also field inquiries through this site.

Pups will be sold with full registration at $ 1,500.  Deals can be made for a breeding guardian home, but those inquiries should fielded through the aforementioned contact links.

I am really excited to be around golden retriever puppies again. It’s been so long since I had a chance to see some grow up, and I certainly will be keeping everyone posted on this site about their progress.

 

Natural History

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National Disaster Search Dog Foundation Honored at Petco Foundation Gala

As animal lovers, we all know that rescue pets actually rescue us, but that phrase is never more apt than for former “unadoptable” shelter dogs who use their new lease on life to save…



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DogTipper

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Guess Barli’s Breed(s) + Win a $50 Gift Card!

When we adopted Barli in March from the Hill Country SPCA, we didn’t know what breeds might make up his heritage. The shelter guessed Border Collie and Australian Shepherd but, of course,…



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DogTipper

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Taking a Summer Break (At Two Miles High)

Happy July friends! July is my favorite month of the year. To me, it defines summer. And as you read this post, I am relishing in summer at 9,000+ feet in the air in the mountains of Colorado. We’ll be here until the middle of next week, and while it’s not just a vacation (Robbie is working at Red Rocks for 4 days and I have some work obligations as well), it’s really nice to be able to get away and be with family and friends during the most wonderful time of the year.

During this time, I will be doing something I never do – taking a break from the blog for the next week. If you’d like to follow along with our trip (because if you’re a blogger and you don’t overshare your vacation, did it really happen?), you can join me over on Instagram (both in my IG Stories and on my feed). And I’ll be back with a whole round of new posts next week.

In the meantime, here are a few fun summertime themed posts you might enjoy:

Summertime Family Story Night
Summertime Inspired Cakes
A Summer Day at the Zoo
Summertime Watermelon and Feta Guacamole Dip
Summertime Lemon Lime Vodka Spritzers
7 Ways to Make Summer Last
Deep Thoughts on Summertime

See you next week! And if you’re here in the states, happy Fourth of July!

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Friday Funny: Made My Day

I resemble this remark. Enjoy your weekend! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Saturday Survey: Facetime

I featured a post this week about vacationers FaceTiming with their dog. I’m wondering if many dog lovers do this. I’m old, so forgive me if I’m using the wrong terminology here, but is Facetime (or Skype or whatever) a part of your relationship with your dog? Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Facetime

I don’t know Nichole Nordeman, but I love this post! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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7 Ideas for the Perfect Summer Hostess Gift

8 Ideas for the Perfect Summer Hostess Gift

One of my favorite parts of summer is all of the outdoor parties and gatherings with friends. From girls nights on friends’ patios to family barbecues and summertime dinner parties, there always seems to be something fun going on. Whether it’s a small get-together or a big soiree, I always try to bring something for the hostess or host to thank them for the invitation. These gifts don’t need to extravagant – a simple, thoughtful token of your appreciation can go far! Today I thought I’d share some of my go-tos for hostess and host gifts during the summertime.

1. Plants. I mean, really, who doesn’t love a new plant? I actually give out small succulents as gifts for all sorts of occasions, but they’re especially perfect for summer hostess gifts. If your host or hostess isn’t the gardening type, gift them a faux succulent – the good ones look surprisingly real. Flowering plants are nice too, and last much longer than cut flowers.

2. Summer themed coffee table book. Who doesn’t love a gorgeous new coffee table book? Consider a beautiful beach or picnic themed gift for the host or hostess of your next summer party.

3. Lightweight throw. A party guest once gifted me a pretty, lightweight throw blanket rolled up and tied with a ribbon, and I just thought it was the most thoughtful gift. Summer nights can get chilly, and curling up on your patio or porch with a lightweight blanket is just the best.

4. TIKI Brand Table TorchesYou guys know how obsessed I am with my own TIKI Brand table torches – so much so that they’ve become my favorite gifts for friends throwing parties. They’re truly the perfect summertime presents too, since they bring such an incredible ambience to any outdoor space. They can even be used at the party that day or night! I especially love gifting the Geo Globe table torch and the Pineapple Paradise Glass table torch - they’re both very chic and on trend in terms of design. The Mixed Material Votive table torch is another favorite. I also grab a bottle of Clean Burn Fuel to gift alongside the torches. The flames on the table torches are rich, bright, and long-burning, and truly take outdoor parties up a notch! If I’m going to a big summer party, sometimes I also gift a couple of TIKI Brand Fire Island Metal Torches. (If you’re looking for a slightly larger gift for a hostess/host or for a birthday party or wedding shower gift, check out the Huntington Patio Torch and Cordoba Patio Torch - favorites from my own patio!)

5. Rocks or crystals. Okay, so this may be a little too hippie for some, but I’m telling you guys – so many of my friends love decorating their outdoor spaces with natural items like rocks and crystals. Besides, what better way to bring good vibes to the hostess or host of a party than a crystal full of great energy? (Sage smudge sticks are awesome too!)

6. Summer herbs. This sort of goes along with the plant idea from #1 above, but a really great hostess gift idea for this time of year is an herb plant or two. There is nothing like fresh basil in the summertime, so I usually opt for a nice full basil plant. If you want to take it up a notch, include a market basket of tomatoes and fresh mozzarella cheese.

7. Summer fruit bowl. I love the idea of bringing a hostess a pretty bowl filled with summertime fruit like lemons (for lemonade) or apples (for sangria). It’s unique and practical, and gives off a quintessential  summertime vibe.

I hope these hostess gift ideas are useful for you as you attend summertime parties. And if you have any ideas I might have missed, I’d love to hear them!

This post is in partnership with TIKI® Brand. All opinions are mine. Thank you for supporting the brands that help make Bubby and Bean possible.

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Service dog is picture perfect in yearbook

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Controlling red fox numbers to save piping plovers and red knot

red fox new jersey

New Jersey is a place I think of when I think of a place where animal rights ideology has become quite pernicious.  It is a densely-populated state that still has a lot of wild areas still left within its borders, but wildlife management decisions that include lethal control are quite controversial in that state.

For example, in my state of West Virginia, we have plenty of black bears. Black bears are state symbol, and if you go to any gift shop in the state, there will be black bears featured on so many different object. We love our bears, but we also manage them with hunting season.

New Jersey has the same species of bear, and this bear species is one of the few large carnivorans that is experiencing a population increase. Biologists know that hunting a few black bears every year doesn’t harm their populations at all, and in my state, bear tags go to promote bear conservation and to mitigate any issues between people and bears. Hunting these bears also gives the bears a healthy fear of humans, and it is virtually unknown for a bear to attack someone here. New Jersey has had a bear hunt for the past few years, but it has been met with far more controversy there than it ever would be here. Checking stations get protesters, as do wildlife management areas that are open to bear hunting.

Since the bear hunt began, human and bear conflicts have gone down dramatically. The population is thinned out a bit, and the bears learn that people aren’t to be approached.  But those potential conservation gains are likely to be erased sooner rather than later.

The animal rights people have become powerful enough in that state that no Democrat can make it through the primaries without pledging to end the bear hunt. The new Democratic governor wants to do away with the bear hunt.

But the bear hunt isn’t the only place where the animal rights people are forcing misguided policy.

A few days ago, I posted a piece about the inherent conflict between animal rights ideology and conservation, and it didn’t take me long to find an article about red foxes in Brigantine, New Jersey. Brigantine is an island off the New Jersey coast.

Like most places in the Mid-Atlantic, it has a healthy population of red foxes, but it also has a nesting shorebird population, which the foxes do endanger. One of the shorebirds that nests on the island is the piping plover, a species that is listed as “near threatened” by the IUCN.  Red knot also use the island on their migrations between South America and their Canadian arctic nesting ground. This species is also listed as near threatened, and both New Jersey and Delaware have enacted regulations and programs to protect them.

At Brigantine, people began to discover dead red foxes in the sand dunes, and because red foxes are canids and canids are charismatic. It was speculated that the foxes were poisoned, and the state DEP was asked if the agency had been poisoning foxes there.

The state apparently answered that it had no been poisoning foxes on Brigantine’s beaches. It has been trapping and shooting red foxes.

To me, the state’s management policy makes perfect sense. North American red foxes are in no way endangered or threatened. Their numbers and range have only increased since European settlement, and they are classic mesopredators.  Mesopredators are those species of predator whose numbers would normally be checked by larger ones, but when those larger ones are removed, the smaller predators have population increases. These increased numbers of smaller predators wind up harming their own prey populations.

This phenomenon is called “mesopredator release.” It is an important hypothesis that is only now starting to gain traction in wildlife management science. What it essentially means is that without larger predators to check the population of the smaller ones, it is important to have some level of controls on these mesopredators to protect biodiversity.

Animal rights ideology refuses to consider these issues. In fact, the article I found about these Brigantine foxes is entitled “These adorable foxes are being shot to death by the state.”   The article title is clickbaitish, because the journalist interviewed a spokesperson at the DEP, who clearly explained why the fox controls were implemented.

The trappers who took the foxes probably should have come up with a better way of disposing of the bodies. One should also keep in mind that New Jersey is one of the few states that has totally banned foot-hold traps for private use, so any kind of trapping is going to be controversial in that state. So the state trappers should have been much more careful.

But I doubt that this will be the end of the story. The foxes have been named “unofficial mascots” of Brigantine, and it won’t be long before politicians hear about the complaints. The fox trapping program will probably be be pared back or abandoned altogether.

And the piping plover and red knot will not find Brigantine such a nice place to be.

And so the fox lovers force their ideology onto wildlife managers, and the protection of these near threatened species becomes so much harder.

This sign was posted in 2016 after the first dead foxes were found:

save our foxes

But I don’t think many people will be posting “Save Our Piping Plovers.” Most people don’t know what a piping plover is, but red foxes are well-known.

They get their special status because they are closely related to dogs, and people find it easy to transfer feelings about their own dogs onto these animals.

This makes sense from a human perspective, but it makes very little sense in terms of ecological understanding.

And it makes little sense for the foxes, which often die by car strikes and sarcoptic mange, especially when their population densities become too high.

Death by a trapper’s gun is far more humane than mange. The traps used are mostly off-set jawed ones, ones that cannot cut the fox as it is held. The trap is little more than a handcuff that grabs it by the foot and holds it. The traps are checked at least once a day, and the fox dies with a simple shot to the head, which kills it instantly.

And the fox numbers are reduced, and the island can hold rare shorebirds better than it could before.

In trying to make a better world for wildlife, we sometimes have to kill. This is an unpleasant truth.

And this truth becomes more unpleasant when we start conflating animal rights issues with conservation issues. Yes, we should make sure that animals are treated humanely, but we cannot make the world safe for wildlife without controlling mesopredators and invasive species.

I think that most of the fox lovers do care about wildlife, but they are so removed from wildlife issues on a grand scale that it becomes harder to understand why lethal methods sometimes must be used.

My guess is these people like seeing foxes when they are at the beach and don’t really think about these issues any more than that.

It is not just the wildlife exploiters and polluters that conservationists have to worry about. The animal lovers who extend too much animal rights ideology into conservation issues are a major problem as well.

And sadly, they are often the people that are the hardest to convince that something must be changed.

I don’t have a good answer for this problem, but it is one that conservationists must consider carefully as the future turns more and more in the favor of animal rights ideology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural History

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